final presentation:pecha kucha

TOPIC FOR PECHA KUCHA: MY INSPIRATIONS FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN FROM LIFE AND THINGS I HAVE BEEN INSPIRED FROM BY THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF DESIGN UNIT STUDIED THIS SEMESTER.

Pecha Kucha draws it’s name from the Japanese term for the sound of “chit chat.”

It’s a simple presentation format where you show 20 images, each for 20 seconds. The images advance automatically and you talk along to the images. Regardless of speaker or topic, every Pecha Kucha presentation is exactly 6 minutes and 40 seconds.

Tips to help you

Consider your Presentation Style.
Are you a presenter that tells stories and uses slides as a visual backdrop?
Do you need to prepare your presentation with detailed notes?
Are you the type that bullet points everything you need to say on a slide?
Whichever it is, you will need to be fully aware of your presentation style and keep to it.

If you are the type that likes to talk off the cuff, flowing and ebbing to the crowd’s response, the format of Pecha Kucha will make this hard. Writing everything down for fear of overrunning the 20 second per slide forma can kill your flow, as it is a struggle to switch from usual presentation technique. Referring to notes frequently can cost audience engagement.

2) Keep it Light

A slide presentation should not be used as a training manual.There are just some topics that don’t work at Pecha Kucha. Explaining complex theories or scientific problems is one. It goes so fast anyway, so the heavy stuff just goes over the head. the best topics for Pecha Kucha are anecdotal stories which work great for the portfolio stories it originally started with.

In the real world, your presentation format may be in the form or a class lecture, a cozy portfolio review, or staged performance etc., regardless of what it is, be aware of how much a presentation can do before it become too much.

 

3) The Power of One.

One thing to keep strictly to when designing a Pecha Kucha presentation is that your total presentation should only communicate 1 key topic. Furthermore, each slide should be restricted to 1 point only. The key to keeping things simple is to ask “What am I trying to communicate?” and “Do I really need make this point?”

While this restriction is a must for a 20 second pace, this should be also a key requirement for presentations in the real world. Even with the opportunity of having more time to read the content on each slide.

Many presentations meander badly, or have far to many confusing bullet points on a slide. There is something to be said on the efficiency and impact of keeping slide presentations simple.

4) The Tale of 2 Presenters.

There are actually two presenters at every presentation; you and your slide. You really figure out the value of both “Presenters” at Pecha Kucha. You can use one to support the other, or even design the presentation in a way that when combined together they tell a much bigger story. Therefore, it is a real pity to only repeat to the audience what the bullet points on each of your slide say. Furthermore, this also means that most slide decks can be reduced by 50%.

5) Keep the Presentation Sharp.

In Pecha Kucha you are advised to keep the verbal element to 2-3 sentences a slide.
This also makes sense in normal presentations as well. Focus on the points you are trying to communicate and that will prevent you from rambling on more than you need to.

6) Pick a Topic You are Familiar With.

At Pecha Kucha always pick a topic that you are familiar with, or willing to get familiar with. When you are familiar with a topic it just rolls off your tongue naturally, especially in presentations with time constraints. Oh, don’t underestimate the value of practice, it does make perfect.

7) Pause for Effect.

One thing that was really hard to create at Pecha Kucha was strategic pauses to let points sink in. With the rapid 20 second pace, even giving people time to laugh was almost impossible. This means you could come across like you are racing through your presentation.

This challenge makes you realize and cherish the importance of strategic pauses in a presentation. When you are now designing a presentation that has the luxury of more time, you can now use this time efficiently to drive home key points, increase audience engagement, or even as a great icebreaker.

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Post 10: Sustainability

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PLEASE WATCH DOCUMENTARY “FOOD = WASTE”  IT’S 50 MINUTES LONG. EITHER VIEW AS A GROUP OR INDIVIDUALLY HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=2XHGSKENR5W

Consider what you viewed and the below

ALONG WITH THE INCREASING CONCERN FOR WHAT THAT THEIR DESIGN IS PROMOTING, MANY DESIGNERS ALSO MAKE AN EFFORT TO USE ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS METHODS IN THE PRODUCTION OF THEIR DESIGN. IN AN INDUSTRY THAT IS USED TO CONSUMING LARGE AMOUNTS OF MATERIAL, THERE ARE A VARIETY OF OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO DESIGNERS WHO ARE CONCERNED WITH SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION PROCESSES. FROM RECYCLED MATERIALS TO CARBON OFFSETTING IT IS BECOMING INCREASINGLY MORE FEASIBLE FOR DESIGNERS TO OFFER THEIR CLIENTS SERVICES AND SOLUTIONS THAT LEAVE LITTLE OR NO FOOTPRINT OF THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT.
  • Materials -using less material (lightweighting), fewer materials (making it easier to recycle) and if possible avoiding toxic substances and choosing renewable or recycled/recyclable.
  • Dematerialisation – could include some of the above, lightweighting for example, but also designing things to be multifunctional, or finding a different way to deliver the same benefit through a service or product-service combination, variously referred to as selling performance or results, or ‘product service systems’ (PSS).
  • Design for disassembly – making things easy to take apart so they can be repaired, serviced, upgraded, remanufactured, or recycled, such as through modular design, or smart materials which can self-disassemble when needed.
  • Energy – both in production (which would mean looking at the manufacturing process), and in use and disposal. This includes minimising energy use, moving to the use of renewable energy, and extracting energy from waste in some cases.
  • Life extension – keeping a product, or its parts or materials, in productive use for their optimal lifespan, so slowing or preventing the linear flow of materials from extraction and processing to disposal.
  • Transport – minimising it, that is. Sourcing a renewable, impeccably green material which you ship four times round the world may not be as sustainable as something a little less clean from down the road.

Nevertheless, a ‘green product’ could actually be unsustainable. Let’s imagine you make something that uses recyclable and renewable materials, but you use child labour so nobody wants to buy it, and it ends up being dumped anyway, driving you out of business. You would have thrown the environmental ball up in the air for a moment, but you’d have dropped the social and economic balls, with the environmental one following soon after.

Choose an example of best case practice refering the graphic design discipline which uses materials processes and/or services for design in a sustainable way. Make a post of 300 words with 6 links and 6 images.

http://www.designbynature.org/main.php
http://www.sustainablecommunication.org/
http://www.livingprinciples.org/
http://www.designcanchange.org/#/resources/design
http://www.aiga.org/video-HHH-2013-acaroglu

 

Post 9: Rascal Character Design

Who are your 5 favourite Rascals in character design of all time? Why? Research who originally designed them? What does their character represent and how has this been successfully portrayed? Why and how are they a rascal and what expressions, attributes, colours, props etc have been utilised. Has the character evolved throughout history. Have they been reinterpreted by other designers?

http://www.demilked.com/90s-cartoon-characters-drug-addicts-drawings-paul-ribera/

https://www.retrojunk.com/article/show/1663/my-top-50-comic-costumes

Rockin’ Reddits- Re-Styling Your Favorite Characters

http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2010/05/the-50-best-cartoon-characters-of-all-time.html?p=2

http://www.creativebloq.com/character-design/tips-5132643

http://www.creativebloq.com/animation/top-40-character-design-tips-part-1-animal-based-characters-5132659

Rockin’ Reddits- Re-Styling Your Favorite Characters

Post 8: Character Design

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Pictoplasma is the world’s leading and largest Conference and Festival of contemporary character culture is to be held 4-8 May, 2016 in Berlin with a dense program of inspiring artist presentations, conference lectures, animation screenings, workshops, installations, exhibitions and group shows, performances and of course, loads of character! Over the past decade, the annual Pictoplasma Conference and Festival in Berlin has had the honour of welcoming an ever-growing lineup of over 160+ outstanding visual creators and innovators. Additional on-tour editions regularly take place in NYC, Paris, Madrid or Argentina, further establishing the Conference as the world’s leading meeting point for an international scene of artists, illustrators, designers and theorists… Select one of the 160 + designers that has spoken at the Pictoplasma Conferences at http://conference.pictoplasma.com/past-speakers/ OR  select a character from either publication Pictoplasma  or Pictoplasma 2 both available in the Kingscliff TAFE library. Choose one of their characters and in your own words describe how and why their character design is so successful. Discuss this in terms of the design elements. eg line, shape, colour, texture, tone, scale, contrast, pattern, etc.

POST 7: ILLUSTRATION

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As an illustrator you need to understand the human body – but having looked at and understood nature, you must develop an ability to look away and capture the balance between what you’ve seen and what you imagine.

Quentin Blake

 

Select one of the following illustrators and make a post of 300 words with 6 images and links discussing the quote by Blake.

  1. David Sossella
  2. Gediminas Pranckevicius
  3. Gary Baseman
  4. Maurice Sendak
  5. Shaun Tan
  6. Jeremy Fish
  7. Tim Biskup
  8. Jean-Philippe Delhomme
  9. Eboy
  10. Michael Kutsche
  11. Gabriel Moreno
  12. Gary Taxali
  13. Hiroshi Tanabe
  14. Jordi Labanda
  15. Kareem Iliya
  16. Geoff Mcfetridge
  17. Han Hoogerbrugge
  18. John Burgerman
  19. Rilla Alexander
  20. Roman Klonek
  21. Kelly Thompson
  22. Beastman
  23. Bec Winnel
  24. Yuko Shimizu
  25. Christoph Niemann
  26. McBess
  27. Nathan Jurevicius

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5Ia-AHzxbM Shaun Tan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ-4TGvSODM Christoph Niemann

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=monVUQXz45s Yuko Shimizu

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXAjkLUv7dY Maurice Sendak

https://vimeo.com/116239014 Rilla Alexander

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEH_TnCpBxU Jeremy Fish

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SC61UVWIzg Gary Taxali